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Microsoft word - 1668_01 eco appraisal__draft1_updated

Date: November 2010 Land East of Watmore Lane, Ecological Appraisal
CSa Environmental Planning Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd Report No. CSA/1668/01 Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal Contents
1.0

Methodology
Desktop Biological Records Search Evaluation and Assessment Ecological Context
Designated Sites Biodiversity Action Plans Planning Policy Statement 9 Site Description and Evaluation
Evaluation of Ecological Features Discussion & Recommendations
Potential Impacts & Recommendations Ecological Enhancement Summary and Conclusions
Appendices
Magic Database Site Check Report and Plan Data Search Response from TVERC Data Search Response from Berkshire Bat Group Data Search Response from Berkshire Ornithological Society Habitats Plan CSA/1668/100 Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal 1.0 Introduction
1.1
This report has been prepared by CSa Environmental Planning on behalf of Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd. It sets out the findings of an Ecological Appraisal of land east of Watmore Lane, Winnersh. The survey has been commissioned to provide an initial overview of potential ecology issues to inform proposals for residential development at the site. This ecological appraisal aims to: • Undertake a desktop search for relevant biological records and assess their Review the site in relation to its wider ecological context; Describe and map the habitats present at the site; Identify any potential protected or notable species issues; Specify any detailed survey work that may be required; Assess potential impacts; and and biodiversity enhancement measures. This report presents the ecological appraisal information in a standard format accepted by ecological consultees across the country, adopting various best-practice procedures and methodologies. Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal 2.0 Methodology

Desktop Biological Records Search
The Multi-Agency Geographic Information for the Countryside (MAGIC) online database was searched, looking for all relevant statutory sites within 5km of this development site, the results of which are provided within Appendix A. A biological records search was also conducted for the area of land encompassing the proposed site and adjacent land within approximately 1km. Thames Valley Environmental Records Centre (TVERC) was contacted for records of non-statutorily designated wildlife sites and protected/notable species. Additional records of protected/notable species within this search area were requested from Berkshire Bat Group and Berkshire Ornithological Society. The results of the record search are discussed within the report where appropriate, with full details and maps provided within Appendices B, C & D. Field Survey
The site was visited on 07 October 2010 by Clare Caudwell MIEEM and Anna Price AIEEM in order to undertake the field survey. The survey technique applied is commonly referred to as an 'extended Phase 1' survey. This is at a level intermediate between the Phase 11 survey (where standardised habitat mapping is undertaken together with making notes on dominant and notable species) and the more detailed (Phase 2) survey techniques that may be used to specifically record or survey particular habitats or species. In this survey, plant species observed within each habitat are recorded and habitats are classified and mapped. Note is also taken of the more conspicuous fauna present during the survey, with particular attention paid to any evidence of, or potential for, the presence of protected or notable species. Evaluation and Assessment
Ecological features are evaluated using the Guidelines for Ecological Impact Assessment 2006, produced by the Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management2. These guidelines promote a more scientifically rigorous and transparent approach to the ecological assessment process. This methodology provides a standardised approach, formulated from the views of a wide spectrum of ecological professionals. 1 Nature Conservancy Council (1990) Handbook for Phase 1 habitat survey – a technique for environmental audit. JNCC, Peterborough. 2 IEEM (Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management). (2006). Guidelines for Ecological Impact Assessment (EcIA) – June 2006. Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal The process of valuing ecological features and resources is complex and subjective. The factors set out below need to be taken into account when applying professional judgement to value ecological features. Legal protection needs to be considered separately from value. Features that are important for social/community or economic reasons should be identified as part of the assessment and the impacts on these features should be assessed by the ecologist however the significance of the impacts will then be determined by the socio-economic/community specialist. Geographic Frame of Reference In assigning value to an ecological feature/ resource the following geographic frame of reference should be used: • International; • UK; • National (i.e. England/Northern Ireland/Scotland/Wales); • Regional; • County (or Metropolitan – e.g. in London); • District (or Unitary Authority, City, or Borough); • Local or Parish; and • Within zone of influence only (which might be the project site or a larger area). The size, conservation status and the quality of features or species are all relevant in determining value. Furthermore the value of a species and/ or habitat may vary depending on its geographical location. Designated Sites and Features Some sites have already been assigned a level of nature conservation value through designation. For example: • Internationally important sites: These include Special Areas of Conservation (SACs), Special Protection Areas (SPAs) and Ramsar sites. Sites for which the process of designation has commenced (e.g. potential SPAs, Ramsar sites and candidate SACs) should be given the same consideration as designated sites. • Nationally important sites: These are designated as Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) in England, Scotland and Wales and as ASSI in Northern Ireland. • Sites of lower level importance e.g. Regional, county, district, parish: Local Authority and County Wildlife Trust Sites and other organisations have non-statutory designated sites that are of importance at other levels. Such as County Wildlife Sites, Sites of Importance to Nature Conservation, Special Wildlife Sites, etc. Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal Tree Preservation Orders (TPOs) TPOs are designated by the Local Planning Authority and are based on amenity related criteria. While this designation does not have any implications to their ecological value they should be considered due to the legal protection they offer. Hedgerows Regulations 2.11 The Hedgerows Regulations 19973 provide for the protection of important hedgerows in England and Wales. To be ‘important' a hedgerow must satisfy a number of specific criteria. Biodiversity value Various characteristics of a site may be used to identify ecological resources or features likely to be important in terms of biodiversity. Characteristics include for example the diversity and connectivity of habitats present on a given site and population size/structure of species present on a site and the geographic location with regards to the distribution range of a species (e.g. is the site at the edge of a species geographical range). Valuing habitats The value of areas of habitat and plant communities should be measured against published selection criteria where available. For example, the Habitats Directive 1992 lists habitats and plant communities of European importance whose conservation requires the designation of SACs; Local Authorities and Wildlife Trusts have generally prepared criteria for the selection of SINCs, and so forth. Where areas of a habitat or plant communities do not meet the necessary criteria for designation at a specific level, the local context may be considered if appropriate, and this should take into account potential value. Habitat Action Plans (HAPs) should be considered, as their purpose is to guide conservation action for the habitats concerned. Ancient woodlands may be designated at different levels and may be considered important even if not designated. Very mature habitats such as this cannot be readily restored or created. Valuing species 2.16 The valuation of populations should make use of any relevant published evaluation criteria. For example, there are established criteria for defining nationally and internationally important populations of waterfowl. Some species need to be assessed because they are of biodiversity value and/ or because a proposal may lead to the contravention of the law. In assigning a level of value to a species, it is necessary to consider its distribution and status, including a consideration of trends based on available historical records. Rarity is an important consideration because of its relationship with threat and 3 HMSO (1997) The Hedgerow Regulations 1997 – Statutory Instrument 1997 No. 1160. Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal vulnerability. Some species are inherently rare, so it is necessary to look at rarity in the context of status. A species that is rare and declining should be assigned a higher level of importance than one that is rare but known to be stable. There are many species in decline throughout the UK, many of those for which the decline is more serious are the subjects of Species Action Plans (SAPs). Other rarity-related evaluation criteria include the need to protect populations where the UK holds a large or significant proportion of an international species, e.g. a European population. Guidance is available for a number of species groups, which explain how to identify populations of a sufficient size for them to be of national or international importance e.g. dragonflies in the Guidelines for the selection of SSSIs. The need to protect populations where the UK holds a large or significant proportion of an international species is highly important and the evaluation of such populations should reflect this. Species Action Plans (SAPs) should be considered as they are developed to guide conservation action for the species concerned. Species and Habitats listed in UK BAPs are identified as priority consideration for biodiversity conservation by public authorities through Sections 40-42 of the Natural Environment and Rural Communities (NERC) Act 2006 in England and Wales. The Section 41 list of habitats and species are those the Secretary of State, following consultation with Natural England, considers are of principal importance for the conservation of biological diversity in England4, in accordance with the 1992 UN Convention on Biological Diversity5. 2.22 Some species must be controlled, mainly for public health and commercial reasons, and are legally identified as notifiable weeds under the Weeds Act 1959, or are controlled by the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. The Weeds Act 1959 and The Ragwort Control Act 2003 includes five weed species, which may be injurious. Although the presence of such weeds may have various dis-benefits they may also have some ecological value. The legal consequences of their presence need to be considered and the ecological impacts assessed in this context. 2.23 The Habitats Directive 1992 requires Member States to restore European designated sites where they are not of favourable conservation status. The value of such an area must be assessed in relation to the ecological feasibility of restoring it to favourable conservation status, or of enabling another area to be restored. This means that, even a habitat in poor condition may be considered to be of considerable importance, if there is a reasonable chance that it can be restored to a higher value in the future. It should also be noted that potential value is also addressed in some BAPs. 4 Section 41 List of habitats and species important to biodiversity in England weblink. http://www.defra.gov.uk/wildlife-countryside/biodiversity/action-uk/legislation.htm 5 Convention on Biological Diversity. www.biodiv.org/convention/articles.asp Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal Secondary or supporting value Some features have no obvious value in themselves but perform an important ecological function e.g. acting as a buffer to important habitats. Therefore the importance of a feature may depend on its role within a wider system, as well as the extent to which this role may be assumed by another feature. Social/ community value People derive benefits from biodiversity in various ways including recreational enjoyment and environmental education. Therefore the social value of the site/species should be considered. 2.26 Impacts to certain ecological features and resources may have economic implications. Examples of such features/ resources include populations of shellfish, fishing lakes and sites for rare breeding birds where tourism/ recreation is important. Where such features/resources are to be affected, the likely ecological changes should be described and expert advice sought from an economist on the economic value. It is important to identify ecological resources/ features that are subject to specific legislation e.g. Statutory Wildlife Sites, protected species. In all cases legal and other guidance should be followed to determine whether a proposal will cause any contravention of legal status or protection, or have a significant effect on the integrity of a system, resource or feature. The legal protection of some features/ resources does not necessarily reflect their biodiversity value. For example, badgers Meles meles under the Protection of Badgers Act 1992, trees protected under TPOs and species legally identified as notifiable weeds. Legal provisions/ consequences need to be considered but the biodiversity value should be assessed as described previously. Multi-functional features Some features may have ecological, social and/ or economic value and therefore the impact on all aspects should be assessed separately before an integrated appraisal is carried out. The IEEM (2006) guidelines have been developed to promote a more scientifically thorough and clear approach to ecological evaluation and EcIA. The process of valuing ecological features and resources is complex and subjective and the approach set out above requires careful consideration of a range of factors and the use of professional judgement. Whilst values may still be summarised for convenience in terms of a geographical framework, e.g. county value, parish value etc, it is important that the rationale behind this final evaluation is carefully considered. Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal 3.0 Ecological
Designated Sites
The MAGIC database search (see Appendix A) has revealed that there are no statutory wildlife site designations covering any part of the proposed development site. One Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) occurs within a 5km radius of the site. A brief description of the site is given below. All distances provided are approximate. • Lodge Wood & Sandford Mill SSSI – located c.2.2km north-west of the site. This site consists of two small wet woodlands bordering the River Loddon, notable for large populations of the rare Loddon Lily Leucojum aestivum. Both woodlands are dominated by alder and crack willow, together with some ash. The southern part of Lodge Wood is drier and dominated by pedunculate oak and ash. This drier part also supports stands of bluebell. Both woodlands support large colonies of Loddon Lily which has a very restricted distribution within Britain and is listed in the British Red Data Book of vascular plants. In addition to the statutory site described above MAGIC has also revealed the presence of five Local Nature Reserves (LNR's) within a 5km radius of the survey area. These include; • Holt Copse & Joel Park LNR – c.1.5km south-east of the site This site is an ancient semi-natural woodland. It also contains an area of wet grassland and a noctule bat roost. Lavells Lake LNR – c.1.8km north-west of the site Has a rich and varied bird population which is nationally known for its migratory and resident species. Alders Moors LNR – 3.2km north-west of the site This site is an ancient woodland dominated by alder. Maiden Eriegh Park LNR – 3.3km west of the site The reserve consists of areas of ancient and secondary woodland, grassland, a lake, brook, pond and surrounding wetland. Highwood LNR – 3.7km north-west of the site This site is a mixed lowland woodland with an area of heathland. The site contains exotic tree species which were once part of an arboretum. Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal The data request response from TVERC (see Appendix B) confirms that four non- statutory designated wildlife sites occur within the data search area. These are all Local Wildlife Sites (LWS) as follows: Bearwood Estate, Woods and Lakes LWS – c.550m south An extensive area of woodland with a large lake. Most of the woodland is long established broadleaved woodland. The lake and woods attract a good variety of birds and the silver-washed fritillary butterfly has been recorded here. Furze Covert LWS – c.810m north-east An area of long established and mixed woodland. The northern end is mainly birch, pedunculate and turkey oak. There is some old ash and field maple coppice and larch plantation at the edge. Dinton Pastures Country Park LWS – c.950m north-west This site is based around a number of old gravel pits that are managed for recreation and nature conservation. The site also includes areas of woodland, a small wet meadow and a larger area of grassland. Holt Copse LWS– c.1.5km south-east This site is a small ancient and semi-natural woodland. The canopy is dominated by oak with occasional wild cherry, alder and ash. Bluebell makes up the ground flora with a number of common woodland species. Song thrush has been recorded at this site.
Biodiversity Action Plans (BAPs)

The UK Biodiversity Action Plan (BAP) is the UK Government's response to the international Convention on Biological Diversity which was signed in 1992. The main objectives of the Convention are to conserve biodiversity, to use biodiversity in a sustainable fashion and to share the benefits of biodiversity fairly and equitably. The BAP describes the UK's biological resources and commits a detailed plan for the protection of these resources through the identification of 1150 species and 65 habitats that are listed as priorities for conservation action. Regional and Local BAPs work on the basis of partnerships between local nature conservation organisations to agree local conservation priorities and to determine the contribution they can make to the delivery of the national Species and Habitat Action Plan targets. At a local level this site is covered by the Berkshire BAP, which includes 14 Habitat Action Plans (HAPs). There are currently no Species Action Plans (SAP) for Berkshire as the Berkshire Nature Conservation Forum (BNCF) partnership made the decision to focus its conservation actions on priority habitats. Berkshire HAP's for Farmland, Hedgerows, Woodland and Wetland habitats may be of relevance to the site. Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal Planning Policy Statement 9
Planning Policy Statement 9 (PPS9) sets out the Government's national planning policies on protection of biodiversity and geological conservation through the planning system. It includes the broad aim that planning, construction and regeneration should have minimal impacts on biodiversity and should enhance it wherever possible. It requires a strategic approach to conservation, based upon up-to-date environmental information and the incorporation of beneficial biodiversity features within development plans. Key principles of this policy statement include: "Development plan policies and planning decisions should be based on up-to-date information about the environmental characteristics of their areas. These characteristics should include the relevant biodiversity and geological resources of the area"; • "Plan policies and planning decisions should aim to maintain, and enhance, restore or add to biodiversity…"; and "Where a planning decision would result in significant harm to biodiversity which cannot be prevented or adequately mitigated against, appropriate compensation measures should be sought. If that significant harm cannot be prevented, adequately mitigated against, or compensated for, then planning permission should be refused." Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal 4.0 Site Description and Evaluation

General Site Description
The survey site consists of a number of semi-improved grassland fields enclosed by hedgerows and trees. Numerous semi-mature and mature broad-leaved trees occur throughout the site within a small wooded area/ tree lines and as isolated specimens. The land use surrounding the site is dominated by residential housing to the north and the west. Rough grassland and Emm Brook borders the site to the east. To the south of the site lies the M4 motorway. The habitats present within this site are illustrated on the Habitats Plan (CSA/1668/100) in Appendix E. Hedgerows have been assigned labels H1 – H7 on this plan for descriptive purposes and these are referred to below. Habitats
The majority of the site comprises of species poor semi-improved grassland fields, grazed at the time of survey by sheep. Field F1 is dominated by perennial rye-grass Lolium perenne, with occasional Yorkshire fog Holcus lanatus, smooth meadow grass Poa pratensis and cock's foot Dactylis glomerata. Herb species present include, creeping buttercup Ranunculus repens, creeping thistle Cirsium arvense, common mouse-ear Cerastium fontanum and patches of common nettle Urtica dioica. Field F2 and F3 both comprise small areas of semi-improved rough grassland. Neither area appears to be regularly managed, with dense bramble Rubus fruticosus agg. scrub encroaching in F2 and scattered tall ruderals, bramble scrub and oak saplings occurring within F3. In contrast grassland to the west of F3 is managed as short amenity grassland associated with the neighbouring housing development. The grassland within F2 and F3 comprises of smooth meadow grass, cock's foot and perennial rye-grass, with a dense sward dominated by red fescue Festuca rubra in some areas of F3. Broadleaved herbs present include, red and white dead nettle Lamium purpureum and L. album, hedgerow crane's-bill Geranium pyrenaicum, mugwort Artemisia vulgaris, wild carrot Daucus carota subsp. carota, red clover Trifolium pratense, creeping buttercup, lesser stitchwort Stellaria graminea, common knapweed Centaurea nigra, common fleabane Pulicaria dysenterica, ribwort plantain Plantago lanceolata, creeping cinquefoil Potentilla reptans red bartsia Odontites vernus and meadow buttercup Ranunculus acris. The semi-improved grassland within fields F4, F5, F6 and F7 comprise similar species composition, with the grassland in these fields being dominated by Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal perennial rye-grass. Other species present included cock's foot, red dead nettle, chickweed Stellaria media, hedgerow cranes-bill and broadleaved dock Rumex obtusifolius, with occasional pineapple weed Matricaria discoidea, corn spurry Spergula arvensis, common sorrel Rumex acetosa, shepherd's-purse Capsella bursa-pastoris, and white dead nettle. Additional species recorded along the eastern margin of F5 adjacent to the brook (where livestock are excluded) include lesser stitchwort, creeping cinquefoil, common sorrel, agrimony Agrimonia eupatoria, birds-foot trefoil Lotus corniculatus, knapweed, crosswort Cruciata laevipes, greater knapweed Centaurea scabiosa and field speedwell. Tansy Tanacetum vulgare and hawk's-bit species Leontodon sp. are present along the northern edge of F5. A few small areas of tall ruderal vegetation are present within the south-east area of the site, which are dominated by common nettle. Large patches of nettles have colonized along the south-easterly margins of F1. A mix of tall ruderal vegetation and scrub is present within F2 and scattered tall ruderal vegetation can be found within the rough grassland within F3. Woodland and Scrub There is a small band of broad-leaved woodland within the north-east corner of the site parallel to the brook. This woodland area is dominated by semi-mature ash Fraxinus excelsior, with an understory of elder Sambucus nigra, field maple Acer campestre, blackthorn Prunus spinosa and hawthorn Crataegus monogyna. Ground flora consists of common nettle, and rough grassland particularly around the edge of the woodland. Species within the rough grassland include false oat grass Arrhenatherum elatius, cleavers Galium aparine, comfrey Symphytum sp. and burdock Arctium sp., indicating the damp nature of this area adjacent to Emm Brook. Several of the trees within the woodland were noted to have standing deadwood. A belt of blackthorn scrub borders the woodland in the eastern corner of the site. Further dense patches of scrub occur in the north-west corner of the site in field F5 consisting of bramble and within field F2 where it comprises bramble and dog-rose Rosa canina. Scattered Trees A number of semi-mature and mature trees are present along field boundaries, with some scattered specimens also occurring within the site. The tree lines are dominated by planted semi-mature and mature ash, willow Salix sp. and oak Quercus robur, with occasional field maple and poplar species Populus sp. Although outside of the survey area, it is worth noting that a number of semi-mature to mature trees occur just beyond the eastern site boundary with their limbs overhanging into field F5 in places. Semi-mature and mature trees are shown on the Habitats Plan. Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal The majority of the fields are bordered by hedgerows, which are generally semi-mature to mature. Several of the hedgerows have semi-mature to mature trees along their length, as identified on the Habitats Plan. The woody species recorded within each hedgerow are listed within Table 1 below. It should be noted that detailed hedgerow surveys were not undertaken and so additional species could potentially occur. Hedgerows H1 and H2 are the most botanically diverse. Hedge H2 is defunct at the northern end of the hedge. Hedge H5 is a younger, closely managed hedgerow forming the boundary with the adjacent field. Table 1. Woody species composition of hedgerows
Acer campestre Cornus sanguinea Crataegus monogyna Ilex aquifolium Corylus avellana Prunus cerasus Prunus spinosa Blackthorn Ulmus procera Rosa canina Salix caprea Sambucus nigra Fraxinus excelsior Quercus robur In addition to the woody species described above, it should be noted that the majority of these hedgerows support climbing species such as bramble Rubus fruticosus agg. and ivy. The ground flora observed was limited, however it should be noted that the survey was undertaken at a sub-optimal time of year for surveying woodland and hedgerow ground flora species. Emm Brook runs along the eastern border of the site flowing south-east to north-west. As the brook passes the site it is approximately 4 metres wide and 0.5 metres deep with a gravel and silt substrate. The banks are steep and well vegetated with mare's-tail Hippuris vulgaris, yarrow Achillea millefolium, willowherb Epilobium sp., ground ivy and false oat-grass. Aquatic macrophytes include common reed Phragmites australis, fool's-water-cress Apium nodiflorum and floating sweet-grass Glyceria fluitans. The invasive Himalayan balsam Impatiens glandulifera is present on the banks of the brook along its length. Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal Eighteen bat records have been provided by TVERC for the data search area, and four bat records have been provided by the Berkshire Bat Group. None of the bat records provided cover the proposed development site however the closest record lies approximately 375 metres to the south-west of the site boundary. Species recorded include natterer's bat Myotis nattereri, daubenton's bat Myotis daubentoni, noctule bat Nyctalus noctula, pipistrelle bat species Pipistrellus sp. and brown long-eared bat Plecotus auritus. A number of mature trees occur throughout the site which may offer potential roosting locations for bats due to the presence of features such as woodpecker holes and other cavities/crevices. Such trees include mature oak and ash trees present along H2, within the borders of field F5 and some ash trees within the woodland strip north-east of the site. A formal bat and tree assessment has not been undertaken at this stage. Wooded areas and hedgerows support abundant invertebrate fauna and bats are likely to forage in these areas. The boundary hedgerows and the hedge and tree corridors through the centre of the site could potentially be used by bats for orientation whilst commuting and foraging. Three records of badger Meles meles have been provided by TVERC for the data search area, the closest is from approximately 250m south-east of the site, on the other side of the M4 motorway. This was recorded as a badger sett in 2005. The other two records provided are from over 1km away from the site. No badger setts or other field signs to indicate the presence of badgers were observed during the survey. However, a mammal hole was present underneath a tree stump (Target Note 1 on the Habitats Plan) and the origins of this hole are unclear. The grassland has potential to be used by badgers for foraging should they be present within the surrounding rural area. Water Voles Four water vole records have been provided by TVERC however these are from over 1km from the site and it is understood that this part of the brook is not considered to support water voles. In terms of the habitat present, along the eastern margin of the site the brook offers potential for water voles due to well vegetated steep banks and the presence of in channel vegetation. However, elsewhere the habitat is less suitable as a result of dense shading from overhanging trees and encroaching scrub. Other Mammals Two roe deer Capreolus capreolus were observed during the site survey on land adjacent to the site to the east on the other side of Emm Brook. A local resident Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal has provided anecdotal evidence that deer also regularly forage across the grassland within the site. Numerous records of notable bird species have been provided for the search area by TVERC and Berkshire Ornithological Society (see appendices B & C). These include several declining bird species on the Red list of species of conservation concern6 and species that receive enhanced protection (all wild birds are legally protected) under Schedule 1 of the Wildlife & Countryside Act 1981. The majority of these records originate from the 1km grid square that the development site lies within. Several notable birds of prey have been recorded within the search area including red kite Milvus milvus, black kite Milvus migrans (annual vagrant to Britain only), sparrowhawk Accipiter nisus and merlin Falco columbarius. Other bird species recorded within 1km of the site include barn owl Tyto alba, tawny owl Strix aluco, golden plover Pluvialis apricaria, lapwing Vanellus vanellus, green woodpecker Picus viridis and hobby Falco subbuteo. A red kite was observed hunting over the western side of the site during the site visit. In addition a local resident has suggested that barn owl previously hunted over the area, although they has not seen this species at the site for several years. 4.23 The hedgerows, scrub and trees at the site are likely to provide nesting and foraging opportunities for a range of local bird species, including several species of conservation concern recorded locally. Whilst the grazed pasture present does not represent high quality hunting habitat for raptors, the grassland is likely to support some prey species of value to birds such as red kite and barn owl. Mature trees and grassland habitat may provide foraging resources for woodpecker species, with open pasture also offering some potential opportunities for over wintering species such as lapwing. TVERC have provided three records of slow-worm Anguis fragilis within 1km of the site. The closest records occur at the Winnersh Allotments approximately 150 metres south of the site beyond the motorway. The majority of habitats present at the site are not considered to offer sufficient cover to support populations of reptile species. However, two small areas, F2 and F3, of rough grassland and scrub do offer suitable habitat for reptiles. These areas lie close to the railway line to the south, which may provide connectivity between these and other areas. Rough grassland and scrub along Emm Brook to the east of the site is also considered to offer potential opportunities for reptile species. Great crested newt Records of great crested newts Triturus cristatus have been provided by TVERC from ten different locations within a 1km radius of the survey area, with the closest GCN record being from c.575 metres west of the site on the other side of the 6 Eaton M. A., Brown A. F, Noble D. G, Musgrove A. J, Hearn R, Aebischer N. J, Gibbons D. W, Evans A and Gregory R. D. (2009) Birds of Conservation Concern 3: the population status of birds in the United Kingdom, Channel Islands and the Isle of Man. British Birds 102, pp296–341. Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal railway corridor. Other GCN records are from locations to the north of the A329(M) and west of the B3030. Multiple records have been supplied for some locations which appear to have been surveyed several times over the last decade. One additional GCN record was provided by the Local Authority Ecologist from a pond c.150 metres south-east of the site, which has recently been used as a receptor site for a GCN translocation. This pond is located on the other side of the M4 motorway. TVERC have also supplied various records of smooth newt Triturus vulgaris from within the data search area, with the closest smooth newt record being supplied from c.340 metres north of the site. Four records of common frog Rana temporaria have also been provided from within the search area. No records provided cover the site. 4.27 No standing waterbodies occur within the site and therefore no breeding opportunities for great crested newt or other amphibians exist within the proposed development area. With reference to online maps / aerial photographs three ponds occur within 500 meters of the site, comprising the GCN translocation pond c.150 meters south, a school pond c.340 meters to the north and an ornamental pond at about 500 meters north of the site. Whilst potential terrestrial opportunities for newts and other amphibians are present within the survey area, the potential for GCN to disperse onto the site from ponds within 500 meters is considered to be limited. Although GCN are known to occur within a pond c.150 meters south, the M4 which passes between the pond and the site represents a significant barrier to dispersal. Should GCN be present within the other ponds identified then potential impacts to GCN from development of the survey area are considered to be limited by distance and the location of ponds within built up situations, a landscape that is typically less permeable to newts. Several records of notable invertebrate species have been provided by TVERC for the data search area. Most of these records relate to the stag beetle Lucanus cervus and the small heath butterfly Coenonympha pamphilus. None of the stag beetle records cover part of the development site. The small heath was recorded within the 1km grid square that covers the site. Small heath is a widespread species which can occur in a range of grassland habitats. However it is thought that this species prefers well drained grassland dominated by fine-leaved grasses where the sward is short and sparse (e.g. downland and heathland communities). Therefore whilst small heath may use the site the habitats present are not considered to be ideal for this species. Whilst the site is bound to support various common and widespread invertebrate
species there is no indication that it is likely to be of significant value for rare or
notable invertebrate species. However, fallen and standing deadwood habitats
within the mature trees present at the site may offer potential for saproxylic
beetles such as the stag beetle which is a UK and local BAP species.


Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal Evaluation of Ecological Features
With reference to the evaluation criteria set out in the methodology, a range of factors have to be considered when evaluating the ecological features of a site. Table 2 provides a consideration of the features of the site against a checklist of potentially relevant factors as set out in the IEEM evaluation guidelines. Table 2: Evaluation Checklist
Designated Sites and Features No internationally important wildlife sites • Internationally cover the site or adjacent land or within No nationally important sites cover the development site or adjacent land, but one SSSI occurs within 5km. 5 LNR's also occur within 5km of the site Sites of lower level No locally important sites cover the development site or adjacent land, but four LWSs occur within 1km. Hedgerows Regulations Certain hedgerows could potentially qualify as Important under the Hedgerows Regulations 1997 Biodiversity Value Semi-mature and mature trees across the habitats of value or site offer the potential to support a wide range of species and also hold intrinsic value. The HAP for Hedgerows within the Berkshire BAP is relevant. The HAP for Wetland Habitats may also be relevant to the eastern margin of the site. Nesting birds are likely to use hedgerows, trees and scrub in the spring and summer. Bats may use the site for commuting and foraging, and roosts could potentially occur within trees. Reptiles and stag beetle could potentially occur at the site. No records have been provided within the site boundary however protected/notable species records have been provided from within 1km of the site. There are currently no SAPs within the Berkshire BAP. However, there is the potential for several UK BAP species to occur, e.g. stag beetle, reptile and bat species Large populations/important assemblages of species Injurious and legally controlled Himalayan balsam is present along the banks of Emm Brook. Secondary or supporting value The farmland habitats present provide a buffer to Emm Brook at present. Social/community value Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal Protected species issues are discussed Multi-functional features 4.31 Although a wide range of common botanical species are present within the grassland areas, no significant botanical interest has been identified. 4.32 A number of hedgerows that surround the site are mature and several are relatively species-rich. In particular hedgerows H1 and H2 have a good diversity of
native woody species. These hedgerows and the linear strip of woodland adjacent
to the brook are likely to provide habitat and movement corridors for a wide range
of bird, mammal and invertebrate species therefore they are considered to be of
ecological value at the Local level. A number of mature oak trees are present
within the site borders and dissecting the site which are also considered to be of
ecological value at the Local level.
Whilst not considered to be of significant botanical value, habitats within the site provide potential opportunities for a range of local wildlife, including BAP and protected species such as reptiles, foraging bats and nesting birds. Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal 5.0 Discussion
Potential Impacts & Recommendations
No statutorily designated wildlife sites are located within or immediately adjacent to this site, although one SSSI, Lodge Wood and Sandforth Mill SSSI, occurs within 5km. The closest point to this site is approximately 2.2km from the development and at this distance no direct impacts are anticipated as a result of development. In terms of indirect impacts to this site, these are anticipated to be minimal. Lodge Wood and Sandforth Mill SSSI comprises two small areas of wet woodland situated adjacent to Dinton Pastures Country Park and Levells Lake LNR. As discussed below these two sites are managed to accommodate large numbers of visitors, with footfall being directed away from sensitive areas. With such large areas available for informal amenity use in the local area it is not anticipated that additional disturbance of the SSSI would occur as a result of new development in the area. Five Local Nature Reserves have been identified within 1km of the site, none of which cover the site or adjacent land. All five LNRs are separated from the site by the M4 motorway and A329(M) and development works at the site will not impact these sites directly. In terms of indirect impacts, none of these sites will be directly accessible from the proposed development area, although several of the closest sites will be accessible by car. However, in terms of sites such as Lavells Lake LNR and Alders Moors LNR these site are well equipped to receive visitors and therefore the modest increase in visitors that may be expected from new development is not considered likely to result in significant adverse impacts. Four non-statutory Local Wildlife Sites (LWS) have been identified within 1km of the site, none of which cover the site or adjacent land. All four LWS are separated from the site by the M4 motorway and A329(M) but would be accessible by car. Given that these sites provide ample informal amenity, indirect impacts resulting from development of this land should be negligible assuming some immediate amenity space is provided alongside the proposed development. Although a range of common botanical species are present within the grassland areas it is generally not considered to be of particular botanical note. The majority of the site is composed of species poor semi-improved grassland that is not considered to be of significant botanical value. The hedgerows at the site are likely to be important to a range of local wildlife for foraging, shelter, breeding and dispersal and the development should aim to retain these habitat linkages wherever possible. Hedgerows assessed as being relatively species-rich, i.e. numbers H1 and H2 should be a priority for retention within the final design scheme. It is recommended that hedgerows and tree lines are Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal retained and enhanced wherever possible, with new native shrub planting being used to infill any gappy sections. Mature and semi-mature trees at the site are considered to be of ecological value and these should be retained alongside development, wherever possible. Where hedgerows, mature and semi-mature trees are to be retained, a system of protection should be put in place to avoid accidental damage during construction. Arboricultural advice should be followed based on the guidance set out in BS 5837:2005, Trees in Relation to Construction7. This should also ensure that any off-site trees that are close to the site boundaries are adequately protected. Emm Brook which runs along the eastern margin of the site is considered to provide a habitat feature of local importance as it provides habitat and movement opportunities for a range of local wildlife. Whilst the majority of the brook borders the site rather than lying within the site boundary it is recommended that the brook corridor should be protected from potential impacts of new development by the provision of an appropriate buffer zone. Implementation of habitat enhancement measures within such a buffer zone would also be welcomed to ensure that the functional nature of this habitat feature is retained. In terms of retained habitats at the site it is recommended that a Management Plan be provided detailing how these habitats will be protected and maintained as part of any new development. Wherever possible measures for ecological enhancement should be incorporated with the aim of achieving some biodiversity gains in line with the objectives set out within PPS9. Appropriate management and ecological enhancement measures would also be in accordance with Wokingham Local Planning Policies WNC7: The Protection, Enhancement or Creation of Wildlife Corridors, and WNC8: Creating New Habitats Through Development. Opportunities for the provision of new wildlife habitats are discussed below in Section 5.26. A number of mature trees at the site have potential to be used for roosting by bats, as they exhibit cavities, splits or other areas of deadwood. In addition, should bat be roosting within or close to the site it is likely that hedgerows and wooded areas within the site boundary would be used for foraging and commuting by bats. 5.10 Whilst it has been recommended that the majority of the mature trees and hedgerows be retained, it will be important to determine the level of usage and importance of particular landscape features across the site for bats. It is therefore recommended that bat activity surveys be undertaken to provide an indication of the quantity and nature of bat activity across the site. This information can be used to guide future development proposals to ensure that adequate provision for bats is made across the site. Typically for a site of type the approach would be to undertake transect surveys using a number of surveyors and possibly static 7 BSI (2005) British Standards. Trees in relation to construction – Recommendations. BS 5837:2005 Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal recording devices as appropriate. Typically three survey visits might be undertaken between May and August when bats are most active. The potential for bat roosts to occur within trees at the site has been discussed above and should development proposals indicate that any such trees are to be removed or subject to tree surgery works then further roost assessment work will be required. This may involve ground based and/or tree climbing surveys and additional bat activity survey work to watch for bats emerging or returning to roost may also be required. Emergence / return to roost surveys are possible between May and August, with the maternity period falling between June and mid-July. It should be noted that all species of bats and their roosts are protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) and the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010. If bat roosts are identified within trees to be impacted by development it will be necessary to obtain a European Protected Species (EPS) licence from Natural England to authorise works that would otherwise be illegal. A suitable mitigation strategy would be required to obtain this licence to ensure that the development is not detrimental to the favourable conservation status of bats. It is recommended that any new lighting to be installed at the site should minimise potential impacts to bats using retained hedgerows and trees, by avoiding unnecessary artificial light spill onto these habitats through the use of directional light sources and shielding where necessary. Data generated during the bat activity work that has been recommended should be used to inform any new external lighting scheme for the site. A brief check has been made for the presence of badgers during fieldwork at the site and whilst no evidence to suggest that badgers are resident on the site has been identified at present it is recommended that update badger survey work is undertaken prior to development. Ideally a check should be made during winter months (February-March would be best) when holes would be most visible. The scrub, hedgerows and woodland habitat within the site have the potential to conceal setts and the grassland areas and scrub provide potential foraging recourse for this species. Badgers and their setts are afforded protection under the Protection of Badgers Act 1992. Emm Brook is not considered to provide optimal conditions for water vole and there are no records of this species in this section, which is somewhat isolated by its surroundings. It is not anticipated that water voles will occur within this area and assuming a buffer strip is retained alongside the watercourse to protect the brook, opportunities for water vole within this section should be maintained after development. Nonetheless, whilst water voles are considered unlikely to occur in this location, this species and its burrows is afforded full protection under the Wildlife and Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal Countryside Act 1981, as amended. It is therefore recommended that, as a precaution, a detailed survey for water voles be undertaken should impacts along the brook corridor be anticipated. This would involve a finger tip search of the brook banks within the area to be impacted and at least 50m up- and down-stream from this area, to look for water vole field signs. Water vole surveys are possible all year round, however they are most effective between March and October. In the unlikely event that water vole are found to be present specific mitigation and enhancement measures for this species would need to be developed. It has been noted that roe deer occur appear to use the site for foraging at certain times of the year. Development of the area will result in a loss of potential foraging habitat for this species, although other foraging opportunities will remain locally. This species is common and widespread in this part of the country and these no impact to the local conservation status of this species is anticipated. The hedgerows, scrub and trees at the site offer potential nesting locations for a range of local bird species. Grassland areas at the site may offer some hunting opportunities for raptors (e.g. red kite, Schedule 1) and foraging opportunities for wintering birds, although the conditions for such species are not considered to be ideal. The records provided have not indicated that the site is of particular significance for nesting Schedule 1 bird species, however it is also possible that UK BAP species (such as song thrush) may occur. In order to assess the importance of the site for nesting birds it is recommended that some bird survey work be undertaken. Initially, a minimum of three spring/summer visits (March to June) are recommended. The information generated should be used to assess the level of importance of the site for birds and guide development proposals. Aside from the survey work recommended above, should any suitable nesting habitat (e.g. scrub and trees) need to be removed to facilitate development it should be noted that all wild birds are protected from killing and injury, and their nests and eggs are protected from damage and destruction, under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. Therefore, vegetation clearance should be avoid during the period between March and August (inclusive) when nesting birds are most likely to be present. 5.21 Two small areas of rough grassland habitat that is potentially suitable for widespread reptile species occurs within the site towards the south-west corner. These areas of habitat show some potential connectivity with other areas of suitable habitat via the railway corridor. Rough grassland and scrub also occurs along the brook corridor to the east of the site, offering some potential opportunities for reptiles in close proximity to the survey area. Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal 5.22 All British reptile species are listed within Schedule 5 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) and are afforded protection against killing and injury under parts of sub-section 9(1) of the Act. In addition all British reptile species are priority species within the UK BAP. A reptile presence/absence survey is recommended in areas of suitable habitat within the site to establish the presence/absence of reptiles. Should reptiles be found to be present then a Reptile Mitigation Strategy would then need to be developed and agreed with the Local Authority Ecologist as part of the planning process. Great crested newt The data search revealed the presence of several great crested newt records within 1km of the site. Whilst no standing water bodies occur within or immediately adjacent to the survey area, three ponds have been identified within c. 500 meters of the site. Although GCN are known to occur within the closest pond to the site, the M4 is considered to represent a barrier to dispersal and potential for GCN to disperse onto the site from other waterbodies identified is also considered to be limited (as discussed in Sections 4.26 and 4.27). 5.24 Whilst the potential for GCN to disperse into the proposed development is considered to be limited it is important to note that great crested newts and their habitats are protected in the UK under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) and the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010, under which it is an offence to deliberately capture, injure or kill, disturb or damage or disturb a breeding site or resting place for great crested newts. Natural England guidelines recommend that the potential for GCN to occur within 500 meters of a proposed development site is investigated so that any potential impacts to GCN can be assessed. Whilst the potential for impacts to GCN is considered to be low at present, it is recommended that survey work be undertaken to establish the presence / absence of great crested newts within ponds occurring within c.500m of the site, where there is potential for newts to disperse onto the site. GCN survey work would typically involve a combination of Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) assessments and pond surveys. Pond surveys can only be undertaken between mid-March and mid-June, with at least half of the surveys undertaken between mid-April to mid-May. Should great created newts be identified during the course of the survey then a Mitigation Strategy would need to be developed and agreed as part of the planning process, and the need for the European Protected Species license from Natural England would need to be considered. It is recommended that GCN survey work be undertaken at an early stage so that provision can be made at an early point in the planning and design process. The site is considered likely to support a range of common invertebrates and some potential exists for stag beetle to utilize deadwood habitats. If possible any felled deadwood should be left on-site as log piles within the base of retained hedgerows, to provide opportunities for saproxylic invertebrates. Deadwood habitat within the ‘wooded' area adjacent to the stream should be retained. Where Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal possible mature trees containing standing deadwood should be retained to providing an on-going dead wood resource. Ecological Enhancement
In addition to the recommendations made for specific habitats/species above, it is recommended that opportunities be explored to provide ecological enhancements in line with the guidance within PPS9, such as: • Prescriptions for the future management of retained and enhanced habitats, such as the hedgerows, trees and any new wildlife planting should be included within a landscape and ecology management plan for the site to maximise their biodiversity value in the long term. • It has been recommended that boundary features be enhanced with native planting. It is also recommended that landscape proposals explore opportunities to incorporate native species wherever possible. It has been recommended that a habitat buffer be provided along the eastern margin of the site to minimize any disturbance impacts to wildlife using the brook corridor. Such as buffer would provide opportunities for wildlife enhancement, through the use of native planting and the inclusion of wildlife features such as log piles etc. Such protection of the brook would good towards the targets set out in the local BAP for wetlands. • Several bat boxes could be erected on suitably retained trees and bat roost units could be incorporated into new buildings to increase bat roosting opportunities at the site. • Several bird nest boxes could be erected on suitable retained trees and on new buildings to provide opportunities for nesting birds. • The positioning and specification for any new bird nesting and bat roosting features should be informed by the results of bat activity surveys and bird surveys, as recommended within this report. Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal 6.0 Summary and Conclusions

6.1
The proposed development site does not occur within or adjacent to any statutory or non-statutory wildlife site and no impacts to the ecological value of wildlife sites within 5km are anticipated. The majority of the site comprises species poor semi-improved grassland that is not considered to be of significant botanical value. The hedgerows and semi mature/mature trees at the site are considered to be of local ecological value and these features are recommended for retention and enhancement wherever possible. Where loss of these features is unavoidable, appropriate compensatory planting and other measures should be provided, assuming that appropriate mitigation for any protected species present can also be provided. Several ecological enhancement measures are also recommended to provide new features for biodiversity at the site in line with PPS9. Further surveys have been recommended to assess the impacts of development and inform any mitigation required: Bats – Bat activity surveys are recommended to provide an indication of
the level and pattern of bat activity across the site and determine the
presence of any features of key importance for foraging and/or commuting.
Detailed inspections of semi mature and mature trees to be lost or subject
to tree survey work, to explore their potential to support bat roosts, with
further emergence / return to roost surveys also potentially being required.
Bat activity surveys can be undertaken between May and August.
Water Voles – Finger-tip search recommended should potential impacts
to the brook corridor be anticipated. However, low potential for water to
occur identified.
Birds – Breeding bird survey work (March-July) is recommended to
assess the value of the site for birds. The information generated can be
used to guide mitigation and enhancement measures as appropriate.
Reptiles – Presence/absence survey to be undertaken if development
proposals involve the loss of rough grassland habitat as identified. Six
checks to be undertaken between April-September.
Great crested newts – HSI and/or presence/absence surveys of ponds
within 500m to be undertaken (as appropriate) to inform an assessment of
the likelihood of impacts to GCN occurring from development of the site.
Subject to the further surveys above and certain working methods and timing constraints to avoid potential impacts to water voles and nesting birds, it is Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning Land East of Watmore Lane, Winnersh Ecological Appraisal considered that this site could be re-developed without significant residual ecological impacts. Taylor Wimpey UK Ltd CSa Environmental Planning APPENDIX A
MAGIC Database Site Check Report and Plan MAGIC Print Output Site Check Report Site Check Report
Report generated on September 28 2010. You clicked on the point:
Grid Ref: SU 790 706 Full Grid Ref: 479015 , 170667 The following features have been found within 5,000 metres of your search point:
Counties, Metropolitan Districts and Unitary Authorities (GB)
UNITARY AUTHORITY WOKINGHAM UNITARY AUTHORITY READING UNITARY AUTHORITY WINDSOR AND MAIDENHEAD UNITARY AUTHORITY BRACKNELL FOREST NUTS1 - Government Office Regions (GB)
http://www.statistics.gov.uk/geography/nuts_se.asp SOUTH EAST UKJ Local Nature Reserves (England)
MAIDEN ERIEGH PARK HOLT COPSE & JOEL PARK 1009921 National Nature Reserves (England)
There are no features within your search area. Ramsar Sites (England)
There are no features within your search area. Special Protection Areas (England)
There are no features within your search area. Special Areas of Conservation (England)
There are no features within your search area. Sites of Special Scientific Interest (England)
1003870 LODGE WOOD & SANDFORD MILL 1000495 To save the report, select "Save" or "Save As" from the File menu. You should save the file with a .html extension and give it a name of
You can then open your report using your web browser software. Print Report Close Window SITE NAME: LODGE WOOD AND SANDFORD MILL
Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) notified under Section 28 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act1981 Local Planning Authorities:
Wokingham District Council, Berkshire County Council National Grid Reference:
Ordnance Survey Sheet 1:50,000:
1:10,000: SU77 SE
Date Notified (Under 1949 Act):
Date of Last Revision: 1982
Date Notified (Under 1981 Act):
Date of Last Revision:
Area: 2.3 ha 5.7 ac
Other information: Part of the site was included within the Loddon Valley SSSI, first notified in 1953. Lodge Wood
is a nature reserve managed by Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Naturalists Trust.
Description and Reasons for Notification
This site consists of two small wet woodlands bordering the River Loddon, notable for large populations of the rare LoddonLily.
The woodlands are situated on London Clay, which is largely overlain by alluvium at Sandford Mill and valley gravel atLodge Wood. The poorly-drained and seasonally-waterlogged soils conform to the Fladbury 3 and Hurst associations, andconsist of stoneless, fine, clay-like silts and loams. Both woodlands occur on relatively flat ground which is affected bygroundwater and susceptible to intermittent flooding from the Loddon.
Although Lodge Wood is shown on Rocque's map of Berkshire in 1761 and may be an ancient woodland site, managementhas modified its original composition and structure. Both woodlands are dominated by alder and crack willow Salixfragilis, together with some ash. There is a relatively poorly developed understorey which includes hazel, dogwood, elder,blackthorn and red currant Ribes sylvestre. The southern part of Lodge Wood is drier, and dominated by pedunculateoak and ash, with some hawthorn and spindle and occasional planted exotics.
The humic soils which have high levels of nutrients following enrichment by floodwaters, support a limited ground flora,heavily dominated by stinging nettle Urtica dioica, goosegrass Galium aparine and ground-ivy Glechoma hederacea.
Less common species include primrose Primula vulgaris, wood anemone Anemone nemorosa, dog's mercuryMercurialis perennis and lesser celandine Ranunculus ficaria, together with marsh marigold Caltha palustris andmoschatel Adoxa moschatellina on wetter ground. The drier soils in the southern part of Lodge Wood support standsof bluebell Hyacinthoides non-scripta and wild daffodil Narcissus pseudonarcissus. Twenty-two species of moss andliverwort have been recorded.
Both Lodge Wood and Sandford Mill Woods support large colonies of Loddon Lily or summer snowflake Leucojumaestivum. This species has a very restricted distribution in Britain, and is listed in the British Red Data Book of vascularplants. In England it is largely confined to the Thames Basin, with one centre of distribution between Reading andWindsor, and another between Goring and Abingdon. It was first recorded from near Reading in 1799, and from theconfluence of the Thames and Loddon in 1809. Because of its mode of dispersal the Loddon Lily is almost whollyassociated with rivers, and the majority of colonies are found on islands or in dense willow carr. After flowering in Aprilor May, when it is pollinated by bees, the fruits develop flotation chambers. Although they remain attached to the stem,in the event of flooding the stems break and the fruits are carried downstream and stranded amongst debris in thickets oron flood-plains. The bulbs can also be transported during heavy floods and deposited on river banks.
Although 48 native sites for Loddon Lily are known in England, there are very few sizeable populations. The mainstrongholds are the Thames east of Reading, and near the headwaters of the River Loddon, from which its commonEnglish name derives. The two small sites at Lodge Wood and Sandford Mill are estimated to contain over 10% of thetotal English population.
APPENDIX B
Biological Data Search Response from


Berkshire Local Wildlife Site Description
Site Name: Dinton Pastures Country Park Site Code: SU77W02 Grid Reference: SU780724 Local Authority: Wokingham Area (ha): 121.09 Last Survey Date: Most data comes from the 1980s and 1990s This site is a large country park managed by Wokingham District Council. It is based around a number of old gravel pits that are managed for recreation and nature conservation. The site also includes areas of woodland, a small wet meadow and a larger area of grassland in the west.
Prepared by TVERC Berkshire Local Wildlife Site Description
Site Name: Furze Covert Site Code: SU77V01 Grid Reference: SU798715 Local Authority: Wokingham Last Survey Date: 21/7/1981 An area of long established and mixed woodland. The northern end is mainly birch, pedunculate and turkey oaks. There is some old ash and field maple coppice and larch plantation at the edge. There is a pond with an area of lime at the edge along with planted alder and some willow. Further south there are small areas of hornbeam. Wild service tree has been recorded here though this is outside the boundary of the Wildlife Heritage Site.
Prepared by TVERC Local Wildlife Site Description
Site Name: Bearwood Estate – Woods and Lakes Site Code: SU76U03 Grid Reference: SU776686 Local Authority: Wokingahm Last Survey Date: 22/7/1996 An extensive area of woodland with a large lake. Most of the woodland is long established broadleaved woodland. There are some areas of conifer plantation and mixed woodland. There are a number of species associated with ancient woodland here including wood spurge, yellow archangel and yellow pimpernel. Grassy rides have betony, common centaury and tormentil. Records of heather, bell heather and cross-leaved heath suggest that parts of the site may have been heathland prior to planting with trees. A variety of other species associated with acidic soils have been recorded including heath speedwell, gorse and trailing and slender St John's worts. The lake and woods attract a good variety of birds and the site was regularly recorded by the British Trust for Ornithology. The silver-washed fritillary butterfly was recorded in 1996.
Prepared by TVERC Local Wildlife Site
NAME:Holt Copse WHS GRID REF: SU804693 UNITARY AUTHORITY: Wokingham SITE CODE: SU86E01 TOTAL SIZE OF AREA (Ha): 2.69 ha DATE OF SURVEYS: 02/05/1984 30/06/1986 12/08/2005 Not a full survey SITE OVERVIEW/ABSTRACT Holt Copse is a small ancient and semi-natural woodland located towards the north of Wokingham. It is part of the Holt Copse and Joel Park Local Nature Reserve. The canopy is dominated by oak (semi-mature) with occasional wild cherry, alder and ash. The understorey is made up of hazel, holly with areas of elder, rowan and hawthorn. A couple of mature trees are present, including a large wild cherry. Bluebell makes up the field layer with wood avens, ivy, tufted hair-grass, ground ivy, herb robert, enchanter's nightshade, occasional wood melick and in areas dense bramble. Lots of natural regeneration is apparent, where saplings include ash, sycamore, elder, rowan and hawthorn. A recent area of hazel coppice lies towards the north, with lots of re-sprouting shoots. Some oak standards are present amongst the coppice with occasional birch, wild cherry and alder. The Copse has several footpaths running through, which are used by the local residents. The woodland lies to the north of Wokingham, where the surrounding land use consists of housing, parkland and secondary woodland.
PRIORITY UK BAP HABITAT(S): Lowland Mixed Deciduous Woodland PROTECTED SPECIES: bluebell PRIORITY UK BAP SPECIES RECORDED: song thrush (2000) RED DATA BOOK (RDB) SPECIES RECORDED: NATIONALLY SCARCE (NSC) SPECIES RECORDED: BIRDS OF CONSERVATION CONCERN (BoCC) RECORDED:
Red List Species: song thrush (2000)
TVERC 03/04 SU86E01 Holt Copse Amber List Species: green woodpecker (2005)
TYPICAL SPECIES OF THE HABITAT TYPE(S) Bluebell, wood anemone (1984), wood sedge, pignut (1986), yellow pimpernel, crab apple, wood melick, three-nerved sandwort, wood sorrel, red currant (1984), wild service tree (1984) and wood speedwell are ancient woodland indicator species.
CURRENT/PAST MANAGEMENT REGIME: Management enhances overall Good ecological condition ecological interestManagement maintains overall Satisfactory ecological condition ecological interestPotential for management to improve Potential for improvement of ecological interest ecological condition An area of hazel has recently been coppiced.
A local group manages the site for wildlife and carries out some recording (including plants and birds).
DATE CITATION MODIFIED TVERC 03/04 SU86E01 Holt Copse Guidance on the various statutory and non-statutory wildlife site designations.
Site designations that protect the UK's natural heritage through statute
Local Nature Reserves (LNRs) (in England, Scotland and Wales)
Under the National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949 LNRs may be declared by local authorities after consultation with the relevant statutory nature conservation agency. LNRs are declared and managed for nature conservation, and provide opportunities for research and education, or simply enjoying and having contact with nature.
National Nature Reserves (NNRs)
NNRs contain examples of some of the most important natural and semi-natural terrestrial and coastal ecosystems in Great Britain. They are managed to conserve their habitats or to provide special opportunities for scientific study of the habitats communities and species represented within them.
NNRs are declared by the statutory country conservation agencies under the National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949 and the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. In Northern Ireland, Nature Reserves are designated under the Amenity Lands Act (Northern Ireland) 1965.
Ramsar sites
Ramsar sites are designated under the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance, agreed in Ramsar, Iran, in 1971. Originally intended to protect sites of importance especially as waterfowl habitat, the Convention has broadened its scope over the years to cover all aspects of wetland conservation and wise use, recognizing wetlands as ecosystems that are extremely important for biodiversity conservation in general and for the well-being of human communities. The Convention adopts a broad definition of wetland, namely "areas of marsh, fen, peatland or water, whether natural or artificial, permanent or temporary, with water that is static or flowing, fresh, brackish or salt, including areas of marine water the depth of which at low tide does not exceed six metres". Wetlands "may incorporate riparian and coastal zones adjacent to the wetlands, and islands or bodies of marine water deeper than six metres at low tide lying within the wetlands".
There are no Ramsar sites in Berkshire or Oxfordshire.
Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) (England, Scotland and Wales)
The SSSI series has developed since 1949 as the national suite of sites providing statutory protection for the best examples of the UK's flora, fauna, or geological or physiographical features. These sites are also used to underpin other national and international nature conservation designations. Most SSSIs are privately-owned or managed; others are owned or managed by public bodies or non-government organisations.
Originally notified under the National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949, SSSIs have been renotified under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. Improved provisions for the protection and management of SSSIs were introduced by the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000 (in England and Wales) and the Nature Conservation (Scotland) Act 2004.
Special Areas of Conservation (SAC) and Sites of Community Importance (SCI)
SACs are designated under the EC Habitats Directive. SACs are areas which have been identified as best representing the range and variety within the European Union of habitats and (non-bird) species listed on Annexes I and II to the Directive. SACs in terrestrial areas and territorial marine waters out to 12 nautical miles are designated under the Conservation (Natural Habitats, &c.) Regulations 1994 (as amended). New and/or amended Habitats Sites which have been submitted to the European Commission by Government, but not yet formally adopted by the Commission, are referred to as candidate Special Areas of Conservation (cSACs). Sites which have been adopted by the EC, but not yet formally designated by governments of Member States are known as Sites of Community Importance (SCIs). In the UK, designation of SACs is devolved to the relevant administration within each country.
SACs, together with SPAs, form the Natura 2000 network SPAs, together with SACs, form the Natura 2000 network.
Special Protection Areas (SPA)
SPAs are classified by the UK Government under the EC Birds Directive. SPAs are areas of the most important habitat for rare (listed on Annex I to the Directive) and migratory birds within the European Union. SPAs in terrestrial areas and territorial marine waters out to 12 nautical miles are classified under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.
SPAs, together with SACs, form the Natura 2000 network.
Produced by TVERC. Updated April 2009.
Non-statutory natural heritage conservation designations
Local Wildlife Sites
Local authorities for any given area may designate certain areas as being of local conservation interest. The criteria for inclusion, and the level of protection provided, if any, may vary between areas. Most individual counties have a similar scheme, although they do vary. Most Local Wildlife Sites systems involve a panel of ecologists and others in the development of local criteria and the selection of the sites. Panels usually include a local government ecologist, an English Nature representative, the Local Wildlife Trust, the Local Environmental Record Centre and sometimes include a representative of local landowners and local naturalists. These sites, which may be given various titles such as ‘County Wildlife Sites' (CWS), 'Local Wildlife Sites' (LWS), 'Local Nature Conservation Sites' (LNCS), 'Sites of Importance for Nature Conservation' (SINCs), or Sites of Nature Conservation Importance' (SNCIs), together with statutory designations, are defined in local and structure plans under the Town and Country Planning system and are a material consideration when planning applications are being determined.
As part of a national standardisation process these sites have recently been renamed as Local Wildlife Sites in Oxfordshire and Berkshire. Previously they were known as County Wildlife Sites in Oxfordshire and Wildlife Heritage Sites in Berkshire.
NGO properties / Nature Reserves
A variety of non-governmental organisations such as the John Muir Trust, Plantlife, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, Wildlife Trusts and Woodland Trust own or manage nature reserves or other areas of land that are important for biodiversity. These sites may be intended primarily for nature conservation, or for other purposes such as protection of landscape features or the provision public access to the countryside. These areas of themselves have no statutory basis, but a large number are also designated SSSIs / NNRs / SPAs / SACs / Ramsar sites, etc.
In Berkshire and Oxfordshire, BBOWT (Berks, Bucks & Oxon Wildlife Trust) sites fall into this category.
Locally Important Geological and Geomorphological Sites (LGS)
These sites were previously known as Regionally Important Geological and Geomorphological Sites (RIGS) and following national guidelines the name has been changed to Locally Important Geological and Geomorphological Sites These sites are the most important places for geology and geomorphology outside statutorily protected land such as Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). Sites are selected under locally-developed criteria, according to their value for education, scientific study, historical significance or aesthetic qualities. Whilst not benefiting from statutory protection, LGS are equivalent to Local Wildlife Sites, and ''.consideration of their importance becomes integral to the planning process". These may include geological SSSIs where additional LGS criteria also apply.
Other Sites
Occasionally other sites might be shown on maps. These are likely to be sites with some wildlife interest, managed by local groups, local authorities or town councils but which do not have a specific statutory or non-statutory designation.
Produced by TVERC. Updated April 2009.
Legally Protected & Notable/Rare Species Records Land East of Whatmore Lane, Winnersh Search Area UKBAP and NERC Act 2009 BOCC Scarce Grid Ref Qualifier Notable Inverts. Status Hyacinthoides non- W&C Act 1981, Schedule 8, Section 13 Hyacinthoides non- W&C Act 1981, Schedule 8, Section 13 Hyacinthoides non- W&C Act 1981, Schedule 8, Section 13 Hyacinthoides non- W&C Act 1981, Schedule 8, Section 13 Hyacinthoides non- W&C Act 1981, Schedule 8, Section 13 Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Reading Rd, Wokingham, RG4 1LJ Priority Sp.
Kelburne Close, Winnersh, Wokingham, RG41 Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Chestnut Ave, Wokingham, RG41 3HW Priority Sp.
Kelburne Close, Winnersh, Wokingham, RG41 Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Winnersh, Berks, RG41 5AU.
Priority Sp.
Kelburne Close, Winnersh, Wokingham, RG41 Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Priority Sp.
Kelburne Close, Winnersh, Wokingham, RG41 Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C female; male 06/06/1998 Scots Drive, Wokingham, RG41 3XE Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C female; male 06/06/1998 Woodlands Ave, Wokingham, RG41 3HL Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Reading Rd, Wokingham, RG4 1LJ Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Winnersh County Primary School, Winnersh, Berks. Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Reading Rd, Wokingham, RG4 1LJ Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Reading Rd, Wokingham, RG4 1LJ Priority Sp.
Kelburne Close, Winnersh, Wokingham, RG41 Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Danywern Drive, Winnersh, RG41 5NR.
Priority Sp.
Winnersh Crossroads,(near Texaco garage, Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Reading Road), Berks.
Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Winnersh County Primary School, Winnersh, Berks. Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Watmore Lane, Winnersh, Wokingham, RG41 5JS. Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Arbour Lane, Winnersh, Berks.
Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Watmore Lane, Winnersh, Wokingham, RG41 5JS. Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Reading Road, Wokingham, RG41 1LJ.
Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Watmore Lane, Winnersh, Wokingham, RG41 5JS. Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Embrook Road, Wokingham Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Emmbrook Cricket Ground by railway Priority Sp.
Prepared by TVERC Legally Protected & Notable/Rare Species Records Land East of Whatmore Lane, Winnersh Search Area UKBAP and NERC Act 2009 BOCC Scarce Grid Ref Qualifier Notable Inverts. Status Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Reading Road, Wokingham, RG41 1LJ.
Priority Sp.
1km Square Record Priority Sp.
1km Square Record Parts Of Winnersh & Dinton Pastures Priority Sp.
1km Square Record Parts Of Winnersh & Dinton Pastures Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Bluebell Meadows Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Bluebell Meadows Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Junior Rangers Pond, Dinton Pastures, Hurst, Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Translocation Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus 470 Reading Road, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Nelsons Pond, Dinton Pastures Country Park, Hust, Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Male, Female 07/05/2005 Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Junior Rangers Pond, Dinton Pastures, Hurst, Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Male, Female 14/05/2006 Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Junior Rangers Pond, Dinton Pastures, Hurst, Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus New Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Garden Pond, 74 Arbor Lane, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Translocation Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus New Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Translocation Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Male, Female 16/04/2008 Garden Pond, 74 Arbor Lane, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Bluebell Meadows Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Female, Eggs 23/04/2008 New Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Male, Female 23/04/2008 Garden Pond, 74 Arbor Lane, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Bluebell Meadows Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus 30,29, present Eggs Bluebell Meadows Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Nelsons Pond, Dinton Pastures Country Park, Hust, Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Long Pond, Dinton pastures Country Park, Hurst, Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus New Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Male, Female 02/05/2008 Bluebell Meadows Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Translocation Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Male, Female 06/05/2008 New Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Male, Female 06/05/2008 Garden Pond, 74 Arbor Lane, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus 33,10, present Eggs Bluebell Meadows Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Garden Pond, 74 Arbor Lane, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus 33,11, present Eggs Bluebell Meadows Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Nelsons Pond, Dinton Pastures Country Park, Hust, Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Long Pond, Dinton pastures Country Park, Hurst, Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Prepared by TVERC Legally Protected & Notable/Rare Species Records Land East of Whatmore Lane, Winnersh Search Area UKBAP and NERC Act 2009 BOCC Scarce Grid Ref Qualifier Notable Inverts. Status Junior Rangers Pond, Dinton Pastures, Hurst, Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Bluebell Meadows lined pond Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Mungell's Pond north, Dinton Pastures, Hurst, Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Nelsons Pond, Dinton Pastures Country Park, Hust, Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Long Pond, Dinton pastures Country Park, Hurst, Great Crested Newt Triturus cristatus Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Male, Female 2007 Bluebell Meadows Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Tuftys Corner Lake, Dinton Pastures, Hurst, Berks Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Winnersh CPS, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris 470 Reading Road, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris 470 Reading Road, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris 470 Reading Road, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Male, Female 23/05/2001 Junior Rangers Pond, Dinton Pastures, Hurst, Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Male, Female 23/05/2001 Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Junior Rangers Pond, Dinton Pastures, Hurst, Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Male, Female 14/05/2006 Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Snail Pond, Dinton Pastures, Hurst, Berks Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris New Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Garden Pond, 74 Arbor Lane, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Bluebell Meadows Pond, Winnersh, Berks Nelsons Pond, Dinton Pastures Country Park, Hust, Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Long Pond, Dinton pastures Country Park, Hurst, Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Male, Female 02/05/2008 Translocation Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Bluebell Meadows Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Male, Female 06/05/2008 New Pond, Winnersh, Berks Prepared by TVERC Legally Protected & Notable/Rare Species Records Land East of Whatmore Lane, Winnersh Search Area UKBAP and NERC Act 2009 BOCC Scarce Grid Ref Qualifier Notable Inverts. Status Long Pond, Dinton pastures Country Park, Hurst, Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus vulgaris Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Triturus helveticus Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C New Pond, Winnersh, Berks Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Garden Pond, 74 Arbor Lane, Winnersh, Berks Nelsons Pond, Dinton Pastures Country Park, Hust, Schedule 5, parts 5(a) and (b) (W&C Schedule 5, parts 1, 5(a) and (b) (W&C Brook Close, Wokingham Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 1, 5(a) and (b) (W&C Brook Close, Wokingham Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 1, 5(a) and (b) (W&C Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 1, 5(a) and (b) (W&C Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 1, 5(a) and (b) (W&C Winnersh Allotments, Reading Road, Winnersh Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 1, 5(a) and (b) (W&C Winnersh Allotments, Reading Road, Winnersh Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 1, 5(a) and (b) (W&C Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 1, 5(a) and (b) (W&C Priority Sp.
Dinton Pastures Country Park (part) adult: calling/vocalising, feeding, Turdus philomelos Matthewsgreen Road, Wokingham Priority Sp.
Turdus philomelos Priority Sp.
Turdus philomelos Priority Sp.
Turdus philomelos Marks Road, Wokingham Priority Sp.
Turdus philomelos Jubilee Avenue,Wokingham Priority Sp.
Turdus philomelos Priority Sp.
Turdus philomelos adult; in flight 10/06/2000 Emmbrook Rd, Wokingham Priority Sp.
Turdus philomelos No. 18 Matthewsgreen Road, Wokingham Priority Sp.
Turdus philomelos Holt Lane, Wokingham Priority Sp.
Turdus philomelos Priority Sp.
292 Reading Road, Winnersh Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) 1km Square Record Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) Bearwood College, near Wokingham, Ice House in Hibernaculum 1996 Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) H & S Dir (An 4,5) Bearwood College, near Wokingham, Ice House in Hibernaculum 1997 Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) H & S Dir (An 4,5) Bearwood College, near Wokingham, Ice House in Hibernaculum 2001 Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) H & S Dir (An 4,5) Myotis daubentoni Hibernaculum 1995 Bearwood College, Wokingham, Ice House Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) H & S Dir (An 4,5) Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) H & S Dir (An 4,5) Priority Sp.
Pipistrelle Bat species Pipistrellus sp.
1km Square Record Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) H & S Dir (An 4,5) Prepared by TVERC Legally Protected & Notable/Rare Species Records Land East of Whatmore Lane, Winnersh Search Area UKBAP and NERC Act 2009 BOCC Scarce Grid Ref Qualifier Notable Inverts. Status Pipistrelle Bat species Pipistrellus sp.
9 Bayley Court Winnersh RG41 5HT Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) H & S Dir (An 4,5) Pipistrelle Bat species 4 St Catherines Close Sindlesham Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) H & S Dir (An 4,5) Pipistrelle Bat species Pipistrellus sp.
Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) H & S Dir (An 4,5) Brown Long-eared Bat Hibernaculum 1996 Bear Wood near Wokingham., Ice House Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) H & S Dir (An 4,5) Priority Sp.
Brown Long-eared Bat Hibernaculum 1997 Bear Wood near Wokingham., Ice House Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) H & S Dir (An 4,5) Priority Sp.
Brown Long-eared Bat The Furze Dunt Ave Hurst RG10 0SY Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) H & S Dir (An 4,5) Priority Sp.
Brown Long-eared Bat Little Sprinfield, 12 Chestnut Avenue, Wokingham Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) H & S Dir (An 4,5) Priority Sp.
Brown Long-eared Bat Wayside, Old Forest Rd, Winnersh Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) H & S Dir (An 4,5) Priority Sp.
The Old Crown Cottage, Dunt Lane, Hurst RG10 Brown Long-eared Bat Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) H & S Dir (An 4,5) Priority Sp.
Brown Long-eared Bat 17 Chestnut Ave Wokingham Schedule 5 - all parts (W&C Act 1981) H & S Dir (An 4,5) Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 4(a) and (b) (W&C Arvicola terrestris Dunt Avenue (east) Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 4(a) and (b) (W&C Arvicola terrestris Dunt Avenue (east) Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 4(a) and (b) (W&C Arvicola terrestris Dunt Avenue (east) Priority Sp.
Schedule 5, parts 4(a) and (b) (W&C Arvicola terrestris Dunt Avenue (west) Priority Sp.
A329(M) east bound hard shoulder Reading Rd Winnersh Prepared by TVERC Status Key. Produced December 2009 by Thames Valley Environmental Records Centre
Legislation W & C Act 1981 - Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981
Schedule 5 AnimalsSchedule 8 PlantsSchedule 1 Breeding Birds (Please note that some schedule 1 bird records will refer to species that do not breed in the county, e.g. over-wintering birds such as Redwing or Fieldfare. Although we include them in the annotated records, only they and their nests, eggs and dependent young enjoy extra protection under the W&C 1981 act. If you are in any doubt about the breeding status of a bird please contact us at TVERC) European Legislation
Species listed in Annex 2 (tagged as H & S Dir (An 2)) and Annexes 4/5 Directive 92/43/EEC on the Conservation of natural habitats and of wild fauna and flora. This has been transposed into UK law as the Conservation (Natural Habitats & c.) Regulations 1994 where species are listed in Schedule 2 and Schedule 4.
Annex 1: Species listed on Annex 1 of EC Directive 79/409/EEC on the Conservation of Wild Birds.
Red Lists
Species included here are from information compiled by JNCC (The Joint Nature Conservation Committee).
Global Red List
Species listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
UK Red List
Species included in national red lists. This includes red listings based on pre-1994, 1994 and 2001 IUCN guidelines. Global and UK Red Lists Species are tagged with the guidelines date (pre94, post94, post2001) and the red list category. These are: EX – Extinct A taxon is Extinct when there is no reasonable doubt that the last individual has died.
EW – Extinct in the Wild. Species known to survive only in cultivation, in captivity or as a naturalised population(s) well outside the past range.
CR – Critically Endangered (CR) Species facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild in the immediate future.
EN – Endangered: Species that are not Critically Endangered but is facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild in the near future.
VU – Vulnerable: A species is Vulnerable when it is not Critically Endangered or Endangered but is facing a high risk of extinction in the wild in the medium-term futureNT – Near Threatened – A taxon considered to llikely to become endangered in the near future.
DD – Data deficient – A taxon with insufficient data to make an assessment of its risk of extinction.
RE – Regionally Extinct – Taxa that are considered extinct within the region but populations exist elsewhere in the world.
Inde – indeterminate – based on a pre 1994 category: Taxa which are known to be Endangered, Vulnerable or Rare but with insufficient data to place them in one of the categories.
Insu – Insufficiently known - based on a pre 1994 category which equates to data deficient.
NR – Rare – a pre 1994 category: Taxa with small populations that are not at present Endangered or Vulnerable, but are at risk. (In GB, this was interpreted as species which exist in fifteen or fewer 10km squares).
UKBPAP and NECRC Act Species
These are species listed in the United Kingdom Biodiversity Action Plan (UKBAP) as priority species and species listed in Section 41 of the Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act 2006 as a species of principle importance. Although nationally there are a few differences in the lists, there is very close correlation between them and all UKBAP species found locally are included in the NERC Act (and vice-versa).
Local BAP Species
For any Local Authority that has drawn up a list of BAP species. Designations will only apply to species recorded from the Local Authority area.
BOCC Lists - Birds of Conservation Concern Lists
These lists were drawn up by leading governmental and non-governmental conservation organisations including the RSPB and British Trust for Ornithology. The
most recent version was published in May 2009.
Red List - species are those that are globally threatened, whose population or range has declined rapidly in recent years (i.e. by more than 50% in 25 years), or
which have declined historically and not recovered.
Amber List - Amber list species are those whose population or range has declined moderately in recent years (by more than 25% but less than 50% in 25 years),
those whose population has declined historically but recovered recently, rare breeders (fewer than 300 pairs), those with internationally important populations in
the UK, those with localised populations, and those with an unfavourable conservation status in Europe.
Notable Invertebrates
Nationally Notable (Scarce) A: Taxa which don't fall within IUCN Red List categories but are uncommon in Britain
and occur in <30 10 km sq/ or for less well recorded groups within <7 vice counties.
Nationally Notable (Scarce) B: Taxa which don't fall within IUCN categories but are uncommon in Britain and occur in 31-100 10 km sq/ or for less.
well recorded groups between 8 and 20 vice counties
Notable: Taxa which are known to be scarce(occurring in between 16 and 100 10km squares). Often there is insufficient information to assign them to Na or Nb
categories.
Designation comes from the National Biodiversity Network (NBN) species dictionary.
Nationally Rare/ Scarce Plants
This list applies to both lower and higher plants. The abbreviations used in the species lists are: Lic = Lichen, Liv = Liverwort, Mo = Moss, St = Stonewort and
VP = Vascular Plant. The definition of nationally scarce and rare is as follows:
Rare = occurring in 15 or fewer hectads (10 km squares) in the UK
Scarce = occurring in 16 – 100 hectads in the UK
Prepared by TVERC, Dec 2009 APPENDIX C
Biological Data Search Response from Berkshire Bat Group Berkshire & South Buckinghamshire Bat Group
Search of Group Records
Anna Price
CSA Environmental
Dear Anna
Search of Group Bat Records around SU7970
I have checked the 9 grid squares you requested and find that we have the following record
SU7871 – Pipistrelle (roost)
SU785714 - Noctule
SU8069 - Pipistrelle (roost)
SU805695 - Brown Long Eared
However I must, as usual, point out that our records should not be considered a complete record
of bats in the area since we only record sites where we, as a Bat Group, have been called to assist
members of the public or Natural England (what was English Nature) deal with ‘bat problems' or
to take part in National Monitoring of bats for the Bat Conservation Trust. To be certain what
bats may or may not be present it would be necessary to undertakes a detailed bat survey at
various times throughout the year.
The fee for this search of our records is £36 and an invoice is also attached. Payment can be
made electronically into the Berks and South Bucks Account by quoting the following –
Nationwide Building Society Sort Code 07-00-93 and Account Number 33333334 reference
0361/701826930. IT IS MOST IMPORTANT TO QUOTE THE REFERENCE EXACTLY
AND IN FULL.
Please send an advice regarding any such payment to:
K.G.Mekka, Group Treasurer,
57 St John's Road,
Caversham, RG4 5AL
or by e-mail to Richard.mekka@btconnect.com
Yours sincerely
Frank Bover
frankbover@hotmail.com
APPENDIX D
Biological Data Search Response from Berkshire Ornithological Society No. Comments
2 Approaching Winnersh 2 roundabout.
17/12/2007 500 perched 15/02/2002 200 A329M.
1 a timed walk! APPENDIX E
Species-poor semi-improved grassland Broad-leaved woodland Target notes
1. Mammal hole under tree stump.
5F Deer Park Business Centre, Watmore Lane, Winnersh Woollas Hall, Eckington, Pershore, Worcestershire, WR10 3DN t 01386 751100
f 01386 751144
environmental planning Taylor Wimpey PLC

Source: http://www.wokingham.gov.uk/EasysiteWeb/getresource.axd?AssetID=218107&type=full&servicetype=Attachment

Untitled

de Bariloche al mundo recomendaciones para su prevención reformas para mejorar la atención Diagnóstico Genético Prenatal, importante adelanto en la genética reproductiva Presentamos aquí un nuevo número de la revista vención del síndrome urémico hemolítico, que se Huellas, que ya se ha constituido en una vía de ha vuelto endémico en nuestro país.

Prolune_alzheimer#6

Numéro 16, Décembre 2005 Alzheimer : quand la personnalité s'égare Forme de démence la plus fréquente chez les personnes âgées, la maladie d'Alzheimer a de quoi dérouter la communauté scientifique. Et pour cause. Son origine demeure une inconnue. Si on peut actuellement amoindrir certains symptômes, on ne peut encore enrayer le développement de la maladie. Il se pourrait bien que prochainement l'on assiste à de nouvelles avancées thérapeutiques. Les différents médicaments disponibles semblent être dirigés contre une seule et même cible : les protéines. La protéine amyloïde-β occupe certes le devant de la scène, pourtant elle est loin d'être la seule responsable du scénario fatal de la maladie d'Alzheimer.